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Hayriye Gulbudak

Hayriye Gulbudak
Assistant Professor
Applied Mathematics

427 Maxim Doucet Hall
337-482-6542
hayriye.gulbudak@louisiana.edu

Ph.D., 2014, University of Florida
M.S., 2011, University of Florida
B.S., 2007, Suleyman Demirel University, Turkey

Dr. Hayriye Gulbudak joined the Mathematics Department at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette as an Assistant Professor in August 2017. Dr. Gulbudak received her PhD in mathematics in 2014 from the University of Florida. Her thesis was supervised by Dr. Maia Martcheva. She spent 2014-2016 as a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Biological Sciences and was affiliated to School of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. From Fall 2016 through the Spring of 2017, she was a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at Arizona State University.

Dr. Gulbudak's research lies at the interface of Dynamical Systems, Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis, and their application to modeling biological systems. In particular, she is interested in formulation and analysis of structured population models in infectious diseases to study the ecology/evolution of pathogen-host systems. She uses bifurcation theory and studies threshold analysis along with computational approaches. For example, in recent works published in Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, she developed a structured differential equation model to analyze the dynamics and evolution of vector-borne pathogens, and fit the model to data of recent Rift Valley Fever outbreaks. This research is partially supported by National Science Foundation. Her other research has been applied to H5N1 Avian Influenza, Ebola, and phage-microbe ecosystems.

Selected research publications:

  • Vector-Borne Pathogen and Host Evolution in a Structured Immuno-Epidemiological System (with V. Cannataro, N. Tuncer, and M. Martcheva), Bull. Math. Biol. 79 (2017) , 325. doi:10.1007/s11538-016-0239-0.
  • A Touch of Sleep: Biophysical Model of Contact-mediated Dormancy of Archaea by Viruses (with J. Weitz), Proc. R. Soc. B 283 (2016), 20161037.
  • Structural and Practical Identifiability Issues of Immuno-Epidemiological Vector-Host Models with Application to Rift Valley Fever, (with N. Tuncer, V. Cannataro, and M. Martcheva), Bull. Math. Bio. (2016), 1-32.
  • Coexistence Caused by Culling In a Two-Strain Avian Inuenza Model (with J. Ponce, and M. Martcheva), in Advances in Medicine and Biology: Vol 108 (Leon V. Berhardt), Nova Science Publishers, (2016).
  • Modeling Contact Tracing in Outbreaks with Application to Ebola (with C. Browne, and G. Webb), Journal of Theoretical Biology 384 (2015), 33-49.
  • A Structured Avian Influenza Model with Imperfect Vaccination and Vaccine induced Asymptomatic Infection (with M. Martcheva), Bull. Math. Bio. 76 no. 10 (2014), 2389-2425.
  • Modeling Avian Influenza and Control Strategies in Poultry, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Florida Library, (2014).
  • Forward Hysteresis and Backward Bifurcation Caused by Culling in an Avian Influenza Model (with M. Martcheva), Math. Biosci. 246 (2013), 202-212.